Independent Minds, Working Together
Thomas Prendergast

Thomas Prendergast

Professor; Chair of English Department - Department Chair

Department/Affiliation: English
Phone: 330-263-2347
Office Address: 211 Kauke
Email

Degrees

  • B.A., Marquette 1981
  • M.A., Virginia 1984
  • Ph.D., Virginia 1992

Courses Taught

  • ENGL 120: Investigations in Literary and Cultural Studies (Gods and Monsters)
  • ENGL 200: Investigations in Literary Theory and Research Methods
  • ENGL 210: Gender, Sex and Texts, 350-1500
  • ENGL 240: The Canterbury Tales and the Forms of Medieval Narrative
  • ENGL 240: Medieval Literature: The Place of the Premodern
  • CMLT 290: Filming the Occult
  • ENGL 300: Political Theater
  • ENGL 401: Perspectives and Methods of Independent Study
  • ENGL 451-452: Senior Independent Study Thesis

Publications

Books

  • Chaucer’s Dead Body: From Corpse to Corpus (2004, Routledge)
  • Rewriting Chaucer: Culture, Authority and the Idea of the Authentic Text 1400-1602 (Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 1999) (Co-edited with Barbara Kline)

Articles

  • “Authorizing Will: John But and the Recuperation of William Langland” in Ye, baw for bokes: Essays in Honor of Hoyt N. Duggan ed. Michael Calabrese and Stephen Shepherd (Marymount Press, forthcoming).
  • With Maria T. Prendergast, “The Invention of Propaganda: a Critical Commentary on and Translation of Inscrutabili Divinae Providentiae Arcano,” in The Oxford Handbook of Propaganda Studies, ed. Jonathan Auerbach and Russ Castronovo (Oxford, forthcoming).
  • “The Work of Robert Langland” in Renaissance Retrospections, ed. Sarah Kelen (Kalamazoo: Medieval Institute Publications, forthcoming).
  • With Stephanie Trigg, “The Negative Erotics of Medievalism.” in Post Historical Middle Ages, ed. Sylvia Federico and Liz Scala (Palgrave, 2009).
  • “Spenser’s Phantastic History, The Ruines of Time and the Invention of Medievalism,” Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 38 (Spring, 2008).
  • With Stephanie Trigg, “What is Happening to the Middle Ages?” New Medieval Literatures 9 (2008).
  • “The Invisible Spouse: Arthur, Henry VI and the Fifteenth-Century Subject,” Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 38 (2002).
  • “Writing, Authenticity and the Fabrication of the Chaucerian Text” (Introduction to Rewriting Chaucer: Culture, Authority and the Idea of the Authentic Text 1400-1602 [Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 1999]).
  • “Chaucer’s Doppelgänger: Thomas Usk and the Reformation of Chaucer,” (in Rewriting Chaucer: Culture, Authority and the Idea of the Authentic Text 1400-1602 [Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 1999]).
  • “’Wanton Recollection’: The Idolatrous Pleasures of Beowulf,” in New Literary History 30.1 (1999).
  • “Politics, Prodigality and the Reception of Chaucer’s ‘Purse,’” in Reinventing the Middle Ages, Ed. William Gentrup (Belgium: Brepols, 1998).

Current projects include a work entitled Exhuming the Body Poetic: Literary Desire, Public Culture and the Invention of Poets’ Corner and a book on the theory of medievalism, being jointly written with Stephanie Trigg of the University of Melbourne entitled Medievalism and Its Discontents.

Notes

Prendergast specializes in Old and Middle English Literature, and Theories of Medievalism.