Ned Heindel

Ned Heindel, a consultant on drug development for Azevan Pharmaceuticals, will make a pair of presentations at the annual Helen Murray Free Lectures on Tuesday, Oct. 20.

 

Helen Murray Free Lectures Feature Pharmaceutical Expert

Lehigh University Professor of Chemistry Ned Heindel to Speak at Wooster on Oct. 20

01 October, 2015 by John Finn

 WOOSTER, Ohio — Ned Heindel, the H.S. Bunn Chair Professor of Chemistry at Lehigh University and a consultant on drug development for Azevan Pharmaceuticals, will make a pair of presentations at the annual Helen Murray Free Lectures on Tuesday, Oct. 20, at The College of Wooster. Both lectures will be held in Lean Lecture Room of Wishart Hall (303 E. University St.).

The first lecture, which begins at 11 a.m. is titled, “Anti-Terrorism Drugs: Can We Cut the Mustard?” an exploration of the chemistry, biology, pathology, and history of deadly sulfur mustard gas. Dr. Heindel’s group is at the drug development center of the largest academic program aimed at finding an antidote to block sulfur mustard’s toxic effects.

The second lecture, intended for a general audience, begins at 7:30 p.m., and is titled “Wanna Innovate? Incubate!” a look at the dramatic changes in America’s pharmaceutical and chemical companies. The subsequent emergence of small start-up companies has fostered discovery, invention, and development of new products while employing hundreds of thousands of scientists. 

Heindel has engaged in contract research and development for Astra-Zeneca, Air Products, BMS, Merck, J&J, and DuPont as well as for eight venture capital start-up firms. He has also taught and mentored 40 doctoral students, many of whom went on to enter academia or the health-care industry. At Lehigh, Heindel teaches general chemistry, organic, med chemistry, and organic mechanisms, along with three web-mounted graduate courses in a distance-education program. He is a graduate of Lebanon Valley College, and earned his Ph.D. at the University of Delaware. He also did post-doctoral work at Princeton, and taught at the University of Delaware, Marshall University, and Ohio University before joining the faculty of Lehigh. In addition, he served as the president of the American Chemical Society in 1994.

Helen Murray Freegraduated from The College of Wooster in 1945 with a B.A. in chemistry. Her research in clinical chemistry revolutionized diagnostic testing, particularly the "dip-and-read" glucose tests for diabetics, and she was awarded seven patents for her clinical diagnostic test inventions. From 1987 to 1992, she chaired the American Chemical Society's (ACS) National Chemistry Week Task Force, and in 1993 she served as president of the ACS. She and her husband, Alfred, were inducted into the National Inventor's Hall of Fame in 2000, and in 2010, the ACS designated the development of diagnostic test strips as a National Historic Chemical Landmark. That same year, she was awarded the National Medal of Technology and Innovation by President Obama.

Additional information about the lectures is available by phone (330-263-2418) or e-mail.