wilson lecture
 

Mark Wilson Chosen as a Fellow of the Paleontological Society

Professor of natural sciences honored at Geological Society of America annual meeting

04 October, 2016 by Hugh Howard

WOOSTER, Ohio – Mark Wilson, the Lewis M. and Marian Senter Nixon Professor of Natural Sciences at The College of Wooster, was honored as a fellow of the Paleontological Society while at the Geological Society of America annual meeting, held in Denver from Sept. 25-28.

A member of Wooster’s faculty for 35 years, Wilson was chosen for his wide-ranging contributions in invertebrate systematics, ichnology, and paleoecology, and his synthetic study of organism-substrate interactions, according to Steven Holland, professor of geology at the University of Georgia and president of the Paleontological Society. Wilson was also recognized for his extraordinary career in undergraduate education, and his services to the Paleontological Society as program coordinator for six years and secretary for five years.

“The Fellows program is meant to highlight those who have had an exceptional impact on the Society in the areas of research, teaching, or service,” said Holland. “What is particularly special about Mark is that he has done all three at a very high level. His research on trace fossils is top-of-the-line, his teaching is very highly regarded, and his service is similarly outstanding. His dedication to the field and to the society is absolutely amazing. I am thrilled that he has been chosen for this well-deserved honor.”

Wilson, who graduated from Wooster in 1978 and joined the faculty in 1981, said that he is “honored to join an esteemed group of paleontologists from around the world,” which includes 1975 Wooster graduate Tricia Kelley.

“This is an organization that has been very good to our students at Wooster by providing contacts and grant opportunities,” said Wilson. “We do significant field research at the College with little more than a hammer, a backpack, and a bottle of water. Our students and faculty engage in meaningful work and make significant contributions to the scientific community.”

The Paleontological Society, formerly the Paleontological Society of America, is an international organization devoted to the advancement of paleontology. Founded in 1908, the Society was incorporated in 1968 in the District of Columbia. The organization publishes the bi-monthly Journal of Paleontology and the quarterly Paleobiology, sponsors conferences and lectures, and provides grants and scholarships.